Historicizing the Anthropocene: A Peek at Paris

Historians love questions of dating and chronology, and there are two questions about dating the Anthropocene. First, stratigraphy and other sciences have been searching for physical evidence for when Continue reading

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“Impact of fossil fuel emissions on atmospheric radiocarbon and various applications of radiocarbon over this century”

CITATION:
Graven, H. D. 2015. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences,  Vol. 112, pp. 9542-9545.
ON-LINE AVAILABILITY:
ABSTRACT:

Radiocarbon analyses are commonly used in a broad range of fields, including earth science, archaeology, forgery detection, isotope forensics, and physiology. Many applications are sensitive to the radiocarbon (14C) content of atmospheric CO2, which has varied since 1890 as a result Continue reading

“Archaeology of the Anthropocene in the Yellow River region, China, 8000−2000 cal. BP”

CITATION:
Yijie Zhuang and Tristram R Kidder. 2014. The Holocene, Vol. 24, No. 11, pp. 1602 –1623.
ON-LINE AVAILABILITY:
ABSTRACT:

Although archaeological analysis emphasizes the importance of climatic events as a driver of historical processes, we use a variety of environmental and archaeological data to show that Continue reading

Habitability’s non-inevitability

THIS POST IS PART OF THE SOCIAL MEDIA IN THE ANTHROPOCENE PROJECT—SEE THIS DESCRIPTION OF OUR SUBMISSION.
 

A theme that has emerged throughout this blog is that there appears to be a fundamental core to habitability: humans transform the world around them, while being structured by the world. Any account, then, necessitates Continue reading

“Futurologists Look Back”

CITATION:
Sassaman, Kenneth E. 2012. Archaeologies, 8, pp. 250-268.
ON-LINE AVAILABILITY:
ABSTRACT:
The gulf between indigenous and western experiences in the Americas may appear so vast as to obscure the relevance of knowledge about the ancient past to challenges of today. Yet, in imaging alternative futures, people of varied cultural dispositions find Continue reading

Big History, Deep History, and the Problem of Scale

What does it mean to talk about the anthropocene historically? Thinking about this has forced me to take a closer look at a couple areas of scholarship that I’ve watched grow over the past few years: big history and deep history. These two interdisciplinary projects have recently gained Continue reading