“What is ecological engineering?”

CITATION: Mitsch, W.J. 2012. Ecological Engineering, Vol. 45, pp. 5-12. ON-LINE AVAILABILITY: doi:10.1016/j.ecoleng.2012.04.013 ABSTRACT: Ecological engineering, defined as the design of sustainable ecosystems that integrate human society with its natural environment for the benefit of both, has developed over the last 30 years, and rapidly over the last 10 years. Its goals include

“Elysium”

CITATION: Jean-Jacques Rousseau. 1997.  Part IV, Letter XI (pp. 386-401) of Julie, or the New Heloise. Tr. Philip Stewart and Jean Vaché. In Collected Writings of Rousseau (Volume 6). Hanover, NH: University Press of New England. ON-LINE AVAILABILITY: Internet Archive, digitization of translation printed in London, 1784. ABSTRACT: Julie is an epistolary novel set in mid-eighteenth century Switzerland. […]

Pondering a diorama to perceive the Anthropocene

“This sprawling epic is as lively as a natural history museum diorama.” (Stephanie Zacharek, review of “10,000 BC”) Perceiving means to become conscious of, to realize, to understand, to grasp. Natural history museums strive to enable the public to perceive, commonly in re-creations of past worlds. Who hasn’t gazed over a diorama of the Carboniferous […]

Urban Metabolism and Degrowth, part 1

TITLE Democracies with a future: Degrowth and the democratic tradition CITATION: Marco Deriu. 2012.  Futures vol. 44, pp. 553–561. ON-LINE AVAILABILITY: doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.futures.2012.03.016 ABSTRACT (partial): The interrogation of a possible connection between degrowth and democracy inspires some questions of political epistemology. Is degrowth a socio-economic project which can be simply proposed as an ‘‘issue’’ and a […]

“Relative impacts of mitigation, temperature, and precipitation on 21st-century megadrought risk in the American Southwest”

CITATION: Ault, T.R. et al. 2016. Science Advances, vol. 2, e1600873 ON-LINE AVAILABILITY: DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1600873. ABSTRACT: Megadroughts are comparable in severity to the worst droughts of the 20th century but are of much longer duration. A megadrought in the American Southwest would impose unprecedented stress on

The Roles for Indigenous Peoples in Anthropocene Dialogues: Some Critical Notes and a Question

We welcome Kyle Powys Whyte, of Michigan State University, as a guest on the blog . . . click for his bio, or go to the “Who we are” tab. I bet there have probably been more than a hundred events organized for the purpose of fostering dialogue of all kinds on what meanings and futures […]

Mourning the Dodo: On Significant Otherness in the Anthropocene — Part 2

In my post last week I wrote about the Mass Extinction Monitoring Observatory (MEMO) currently under construction on the Isle of Portland off the southern coast of England.  This conceptually sophisticated project, led by the architectural firm of David Adjaye, offers a thoughtful means of linking local, global, and planetary histories of the extinction crisis […]

“The Global Carbon Cycle: A Test of Our Knowledge of Earth as a System”

CITATION: P. Falkowski et al. 2000. Science, vol. 290, pp. 291-296. ON-LINE AVAILABILITY: DOI: 10.1126/science.290.5490.291 ABSTRACT: Motivated by the rapid increase in atmospheric CO2 due to human activities since the Industrial Revolution, several international scientific research programs have analyzed the role of

The effect of humans on the landscape in Oklahoma: Where is the water? And the effect of spatial data resolution

THIS POST IS PART OF OUR ANTHROPOCENE BIOSPHERE PROJECT–A SERIES OF POSTS ON ERLE ELLIS’ ‘ECOLOGY IN AN ANTHROPOGENIC BIOSPHERE‘ (ECOLOGICAL MONOGRAPHS, 85/3 (2015)) Ellis (2015) discusses in detail the idea that to be able to understand long-term ecological patterns and processes it is now necessary to understand human sociocultural processes first. To visualize the […]

Reframing landscape fragmentation’s effects on ecosystem services

CITATION: Mitchell, M. G. E. et al. 2015. Trends in Ecology and Evolution,  Vol. 30, No. 4, pp. 190-198. ON-LINE AVAILABILITY: DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2015.01.011. ABSTRACT: Landscape structure and fragmentation have important effects on ecosystem services, with a common assumption being that fragmentation